Archive

Bringing support for Hawaiʻi Appleseed’s mission of justice and equity to a virtual space

“While we need to hold off on meeting in person right now, our shared vision for a just Hawai‘i has never been more important.”

Ending racism requires us to actively dismantle racist policies around us

Ending racism requires us all to become active in dismantling racist policies in order to replace them with anti-racist ones.

COVID-19 response focusing on assisting state in managing social safety net programs

COVID-19 is both a public health emergency and an economic crisis; Hawaiʻi Appleseed’s concern lies with the working families and children of Hawaiʻi.

Trump’s Public Charge rule could cost Hawaiʻi tens of millions in revenue

The financial cost of the public charge rule is in addition to the harm done to the health and resilience of immigrant families.

Too many Hawaiʻi seniors are still going hungry

Despite recent strides to address food insecurity, thousands of Hawai‘i seniors are still at risk of experiencing hunger across the islands.

No cause for panic: Hawaiʻi’s economy is OK

Hawai‘i’s economy is far from last place, and it’s important for policymakers to know this when deciding how best to invest in our communities.

Appleseed announces 2019 policy agenda

Each legislative session, Hawaiʻi Appleseed creates a policy agenda of actionable solutions to some of our state's most prevalent and entrenched social and economic problems. Based on the months of research we spend each year examining these critical issues, this agenda prioritizes efforts for maximum benefit to the community at-large.

Public charge rule change would hurt Hawaii’s economy

If federal benefits on this scale are withdrawn from Hawaiʻi’s economy, there would be predictable ripple effects to local businesses and workers. Withdrawal of SNAP funding means a reduction in spending in grocery stores and supermarkets. When families lose health insurance, hospitals and doctors lose income. And spending would be reduced in other areas as families struggle to pay food and health costs. FPI’s mid-level estimate shows a potential loss of $127 million in Hawaiʻi due to the ripple effects of this lost spending.