Archive

Free grab-and-go meals for keiki expands to Molokai

The addition of the Molokai site means the now-30 community summer food sites are projected to serve 1.5 million meals in 2020.

Community sites expand free meals for keiki through the summer

New community sponsors include Waianae Coast Comprehensive Health Center, Alternative Structures International, Hawaii Literacy and Boys & Girls Clubs.

Ending racism requires us to actively dismantle racist policies around us

Ending racism requires us all to become active in dismantling racist policies in order to replace them with anti-racist ones.

Trump’s Public Charge rule could cost Hawaiʻi tens of millions in revenue

The financial cost of the public charge rule is in addition to the harm done to the health and resilience of immigrant families.

Too many Hawaiʻi seniors are still going hungry

Despite recent strides to address food insecurity, thousands of Hawai‘i seniors are still at risk of experiencing hunger across the islands.

No cause for panic: Hawaiʻi’s economy is OK

Hawai‘i’s economy is far from last place, and it’s important for policymakers to know this when deciding how best to invest in our communities.

“Occupy Hunger,” urges food justice advocate Andy Fisher

Addressing hunger requires a more holistic framework that understands the interplay between public health, economic justice, and local food production.

Enforcement of vacation rental regulations would restore balance

The Honolulu City Council is set to take up the short term rentals (STRs) issue again tomorrow with new drafts of Bills 85 and 89. Whichever bill ends up being prefered, it is imperative that the council include strong enforcement mechanism in any city ordinance it chooses to pass. This post covers what those regulations should look like, and why they're so critical.

Public charge rule change would hurt Hawaii’s economy

If federal benefits on this scale are withdrawn from Hawaiʻi’s economy, there would be predictable ripple effects to local businesses and workers. Withdrawal of SNAP funding means a reduction in spending in grocery stores and supermarkets. When families lose health insurance, hospitals and doctors lose income. And spending would be reduced in other areas as families struggle to pay food and health costs. FPI’s mid-level estimate shows a potential loss of $127 million in Hawaiʻi due to the ripple effects of this lost spending.