Publications

The Effects of Boosting Hawaii’s Minimum Wage

Raising the minimum wage to $17 by 2024 would give 269,000 Hawai‘i workers a total of over $1.3 billion in additional wages, improving the living standards of affected Hawai‘i workers and strengthening local businesses that rely on earnings being spent back into the local economy.

Priced Out of Paradise

Illegal short-term vacation rentals are overrunning Hawai‘i’s four counties and locals are being priced out. How can county governments reverse the trend?

Hawai‘i Vacation Rentals: Impact on Housing & Hawai‘i’s Economy

Finding affordable housing has long been a significant challenge for Hawai?i’s residents. Over the past decade, it has risen to crisis proportions. Economic barriers to achieving economic stability are daunting for most Hawai‘i residents, and are nearly insurmountable for low-income households. The growth of the vacation rental industry in recent years is exacerbating these problems. While vacation rentals offer the possibility of extra income for some residents and additional tax revenue for the state, many of the benefits go to nonresident investors. The adverse consequences of housing stock lost to vacation rentals far outweighs the benefits they might provide to local families and our community.

Hawai‘i School Breakfast Scorecard

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Read the press release.

Executive Summary

All of Hawai‘i’s children deserve a good education that opens up opportunities for the rest of their lives. But hungry keiki can’t learn.

In the face of some of the highest food costs in the nation, many Hawai‘i families can’t afford to provide their children with a healthy breakfast every morning. Even higher-income families often can’t find time to sit down for a…

Struggling to Make Ends Meet: The Need for a Working Family Credit

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This report summarizes findings from the Hawai‘i Appleseed Center for Law & Economic Justice and QMark Research poll conducted in 2016 that revealed that nearly half of Hawai‘i families are living paycheck to paycheck.

It also found that six out of seven survey respondents support the concept a tax credits that let working families keep more of what they earn. In Hawai‘i, there are many working families who…

State of Poverty 2016

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In April 2016, the Hawai‘i Appleseed Center for Law and Economic Justice released a report entitled “The State of Poverty in Hawai‘i: How Hawai‘i’s Residents Are Faring Post-Recovery.” The report brings together the most recent available data to provide a snapshot of how low-income residents have fared after the economic recovery.

While some indicators have improved, families continue to struggle. Hawai‘i has the highest cost of living…

Financial Struggles of Hawaiʻi’s Working Families

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Hawai?i Appleseed’s 2016 survey found that almost half of Hawai?i residents describe their financial situation as surviving “paycheck to paycheck.” The vast majority flag high housing costs and low wages as major concerns as well as support tax credits that let working families keep more of what they earn.

The telephone survey of 503 Hawai?i residents, conducted by QMark Research in February 2016,…

Creating a State Earned Income Tax Credit

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The Earned Income Tax Credit is a federal tax credit that helps families work their way into the middle class. Since its inception in 1975, the federal EITC has been hailed as the most effective anti-poverty program in the U.S., improving the futures of low- and moderate-income workers and that of their communities. To read the entire report, click here.…

Hawai‘i’s Affordable Housing Crisis

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Hawai?i Appleseed has released a report, “Hawai‘i’s Affordable Housing Crisis: The High Cost of Our Affordable Housing Shortfall,” that details the severity of Hawai‘i’s housing shortage and the financial strain it places on our working families, compiling the facts and figures that illustrate the dire housing situation facing Hawai‘i. To read the entire report, click here.

Housing is considered “affordable” when a household…

SNAP and the EITC in Hawaiʻi

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Hawai‘i Appleseed’s report, “Helping Make Ends Meet: Increasing SNAP and EITC Participation Among Eligible Households in Hawai‘i,” examines the severe underutilization of these two federally-funded programs in Hawai‘i and recommends new opportunities to build upon current outreach efforts and significantly increase participation in our state. To read the entire report, click here.

Hawai‘i has not only the highest cost of living in the…

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